Monday, March 4, 2013

Not As a Trusted Guide

Halfway through Kathleen Stewart's Ordinary Affects, one of the many wishlisted titles I picked up at last month's Networked Humanities conference. Stewart's slow jumps aggregate to an "idiosyncratic map of connections between a series of singularities" (4). A colleague, when he saw the book at the edge of my desk late last week in a place where I would be sure to remember to carry it home for the first interlude of Winter Break, characterized Stewart's writing as "prose poems." I can see that. Similar to ornamented essays, i.e., stylistically adven-turous felt-arguments.

And like I said, I'm only halfway through. Slow jumps read slowly. As much as by anything else, I'm struck by--affected by--Stewart's reconfiguring of pronouns.

I write not as a trusted guide carefully laying out the links between theoretical categories and the real world, but as a point of impact, curiosity, and encounter. I call myself "she" to mark the difference between this writerly identity and the kind of subject that arises as a daydream of simple presence. "She" is not so much a subject position or an agent in hot pursuit of something definitive as a point of contact; instead, she gazes, imagines, senses, takes on, performs, and asserts not a flat and finished truth but some possibilities (and threats) that have come into view in the effort to become attuned to what a particular scene might offer. (5)

To write not as a trusted guide seems at first to go against professionalism and rhetorical ethics, but instead of turning into fanciful indulgence, because it finds gravity in description, it shifts ethos to ethos-oikos, a kind of redistributed or network-strewn, banal registry. A contagious style, Stewart's.

He noticed frost on the Honda Element outside and put off a morning jog, wrote a blog entry, ground beans for pressed coffee. "March was always warmer than this."
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