Sunday, August 10, 2008

195

A draft of my fall syllabus was due on Friday, so draft it I did. I'm slotted for a section of WRT195: Studio 2 for Transfer Students. It pitches itself as a "best of" blend, a rip-and-mix that puts the best of WRT105 and WRT205 into a single course for transfer students.

For several weeks, I mulled over using Pink's Whole New Mind. I read Johnny Bunko, too, and thought about how I could fit that stuff into the course. But at the last minute, I went with another plan focused for now on the latest greatest literacy crisis and also on Googlization (while taking up some of Vaidhyanathan's blogbook-in-progress). So we'll read about and write around some of the stuff that happens when we 'do a Google,' size up some of the apps, and forage around for research projects concerned with Google's construction of the web or the world, grand databases and privacy, Knol, directed and serendipitous search, and so on. So far, the course opens with a digital memoir of sorts (not quite a mystory, but maybe not too far off), some summary and critique work, a researched argument, and a translation (switching the argument into a 2.5 minute audio short or a Pecha Kucha slide-improv, I haven't decided yet). Here's the current plan, subject to minor revisions until I hear back from a coordinator later this week about whether it will fly.

I'm also slotted for ten hours per week in the Writing Center, or, I should say, doing Writing Center work online, as we continue stabilizing some of the consulting options piloted this summer. More on that when the batteries in this cordless keyboard are recharged.

Bookmark and Share Posted by at August 10, 2008 10:15 PM to Dry Ogre Chalking
Comments

Hey, thanks for trying!
Cheers,
Dan Pink

Posted by: Dan Pink at August 11, 2008 1:13 PM

I was very close to giving it a full-on try in the course, Dan. For one, I really like both books, and I do think they would be great fits in our writing curriculum (I started thinking carefully about it when I learned that Alex Reid was using WNM in a writing course at SUNY-Cortland). I especially like the way WNM gets readers thinking about how they think. For what it's worth, I straightaway recommended them to a colleague who is planning a section of WRT307: Professional Writing, so there's still a chance one or both of them will be used somewhere at SU this fall.

Posted by: Derek at August 11, 2008 1:32 PM