Photos and Locative Tagging

Flickr
launched a new geotagging
feature
this week (via).
It’s tied in with Yahoo’s mapping API; via Flickr, you can assign locative data
to your photos simply by drag-and-drop methods. The Flickr blog
reports
an impressive surge in the geotagging of photographs with some 1.2 million
geotagged in the first 24 hours after the feature’s rollout.

Granted, if a
photo already had geotags assigned, the new system automatically recognized
them, so a fair portion of the 1.2 million were probably auto-assigned rather
than initiated by Flickr users.

Continue reading →

Bubblr

Pim Pam Pum, makers of
Memry and
Phrasr, released
Bubblr within the past week (as
far as I can tell…okay, looks like 3/22) (via). It’s an easy-as-can-be comic
interface that taps into Flickr as an image repository. Choose a few
photos, drop in word/thought balloons, type in clever and zany dialogue, and
publish.


I was compelled to give it a test drive:

Banal Airplane Conversation
. Limitations (other than my high-standards
blast of creativity): 1) if you want to copy in an extra panel, you’ll need to
relocate the image in the archive, and 2) the word balloons are somewhat rigid (the
hanging attribution slides, but the balloons have constrained
dimensions).

Fastr

Put your semantic-iconic quicks to the test by playing
Fastr, a Flickr-based
tag-guessing game (via). 
I was in the lead for the better part of a round yesterday, but then I blanked on
a series tagged “youth” (or “young”, I forget) and wound up ninth.

Some Doodling Required

Complete with an explanation of the image retrieval logic
under the hood (here I was
thinking it might be hamsters on wheels),
Retrievr, a beta search
interface, returns the Flickr photos that most nearly correspond to the colors
and shapes you draw (via). 
Tagline: search by sketching. You decide whether its pre- or
post-literate, electrate or something other. 


You read about it at EWM, er, something like
392nd

Images Ovr-flowing

I have exceeded my free Flickr account–split the seams, spilt the banks. 
The free version holds
200 active images, and, when you pass 200,
it tucks the
oldest pics out of sight. Bummr.  Because I’m so thoroughly hooked on
Flickr, I went ahead and dropped the few bucks they collect to switch me to the
upgraded "pro" account.  Now I only wish that instead of "pro," I was
classed as a "spendthrift hack amateur."  That’d be closr to the truth. With
the upgraded account (and its whopping 2GB of storage per month), I have room
for even more fine pics, such as this one from Erie Blvd. earlyr today. 

Fun Crime

Flickr Frame-toon

 




Scrape 1.01

Originally uploaded by ewidem.

Without so much as a clear, definitive purpose (les-sure or lei-sure), I’ve been futzing around with the combination of badly drawn, badly written frame-toons (of my own creation?) and some of the possibilities with Flickr. I’m interested in the combinations and the tools–vector drawings in Flash, cut/paste in Photoshop or comparable such as Gimp, the layered notes in Flickr, and even comments. I need more practice with it–more play–to figure what else might be possible with it, but it makes sense that it could be set up in a whole bunch of different ways (granted it’s not soo different than the memory maps meming around).

Ph. has been watching me rough this one together; says he fancies starting up a blog–maybe this summer. Maybe a Flickr Frame-toon blog. And yeah, I already know this first one’s so-so–squarely in the genre of mediocrity just like so much of my late-April work.

Pickr

Pickr

Not sure where I pickred up the link, but I keep getting drawn back to
Jim Bumgardner’s
Experimental
Colr Pickrs
.  Scheme appears to be running through Flash (in concert with a PHP script?), but I haven’t
the time to dig around for clues about how the images from
Flickr are sifted,
arranged, and so on.  But I’ve got to look into it; probably won’t be able
to rest well until I dig through how it works.  Especially worth
a visit: the

urban decay
and

graffiti
pickrs.